My Doctor Has Celiac Disease Too!

Many of my customers ask me who my doctors are. The Gastroenterologist who diagnosed me with Celiac Disease is still practicing in Rockville, Md  and is retiring soon. I still see him for follow ups for Celiac and Barrett’s Esophagus.

However, my primary care physician and endocrinologist; whom I saw on a regular basis were not up to par when it came to Celiac Disease or it’s complications. One of my goals in 2016 was to find a primary care physician who truly understands Celiac Disease and who did not dismiss it as minimal or view it as not relevant to my overall health. To make it worse, I would wait for an hour or two to see the primary care doctor and then get 5 minutes of their time with no real understanding of Celiac Disease or how it affects other body organs. Neither doctor understood that Celiac Disease affected your whole body! I knew that I really needed to switch doctors. My goal was to not get the blank stare from my primary care physician and endocrinologist when I am dealing with other complications of Celiac Disease. We all know that look; kind of like this:

doctor-confused  The Clueless Look

At the same time, one  of our regular customers is a doctor, an Internist, who deals with the whole body system not just special parts of the body. She is practicing locally and has Celiac Disease; as does her young daughter. What was I waiting for or afraid of?

Finally, I made up my mind that I deserved a doctor who “gets it” and made the move to Dr. Polgar as my Primary Care Physician. This was by far the best decision that I made in 2016 when it comes to my health and well being.  She actually got all of my medical records from all of my specialists to understand the whole picture of my health! She was involved in pre-op for the other surgeries that I had to have last year. I decided to interview Dr Polgar and share her insight, perspective and information with all of you.

When did you know that you wanted to be a doctor?

My parents have been telling me stories about how as a young child I was hospitalized with asthma several times and, as soon as I felt better, I started nagging the nurses and doctors to let me help them. Since my father was also a physician, people always assumed that I was just simply following in his footsteps. However, my father was actually trying to talk me out of becoming a doctor, he thought it was too demanding. It was my experience as a patient that led me down this path.

Where did you go to medical school and where did you do your residency?

I was born and raised in Hungary and went to medical school there as well. After graduation, I finished a 5-year internal medicine residency program and worked as an internist for a few years, still in Hungary. I moved to the US about 15 years ago, initially to conduct cancer research at the National Institute of Health. As fascinating as cancer research is, I missed directly working with patients. So, in order to be able to practice here in the US, I did another 2 years of residency at Harbor Hospital in Baltimore.

What made you decide to specialize in internal medicine?

While I think that subspecialists play a very important role when it comes to patient care, I always wanted a field of medicine where I would deal with the whole person, not just a particular organ system. Being able to build a long term relationship with patients and get to really know them was also vital in my decision.

When and how were you diagnosed with Celiac Disease?

It was my then 7-year-old daughter who was first diagnosed. She had a very typical case with frequent abdominal pain, early satiety and eventually weight loss. It is recommended to screen the first degree relatives of anybody with confirmed celiac disease since there is an approximately 1:10 chance of having it. To be honest, I first had my husband tested because he was frequently complaining of gastrointestinal symptoms, while I was not. When his blood tests came back negative, I was tested and, lo and behold, very high antibody levels were found. Subsequently, a duodenum biopsy confirmed that I have had celiac disease for a long time, possibly my whole life.

Why do you think it is important for primary care physicians to understand Celiac Disease?

For a myriad of reasons. First of all, it is usually the primary care who first sees patients with any new symptom. Even when celiac disease presents itself with typical gastrointestinal symptoms, physicians still often do not think about testing for it.  Back in medical school, we were taught that it is a rare mostly childhood disease which, of course, now we know not to be the case. Another reason why it is very important for the primary care doctor to understand celiac disease is because it affects not only the GI system, but pretty much any organ you can you can think of, and seemingly unrelated symptoms could be due to either undiagnosed celiac disease, or gluten exposure in a previously diagnosed patient.

What have you learned about Celiac Disease that has surprised you?

The biggest surprise came through my own diagnosis, that a practically asymptomatic person can have “full-blown” celiac disease. This definitely led me down a path to learn as much as possible about this intriguing disease.

Why did you decide to leave Johns Hopkins and start your own practice?

I was growing more and more frustrated with what I call “assembly line medicine”. Decreasing insurance reimbursements force practices to compensate by seeing more patients. The only way to do that is to spend less time with one patient. I found myself not having time to do the things that I probably enjoy the most in medicine: educating patients and being able to thoroughly think through cases. As I mentioned previously, I like to look at the whole person not just concentrate on a single complaint. This cannot be done in 10-15 minutes.

How is your practice set up to give patients the individual attention that they need along with the best possible care?

My practice is based on a novel idea called Direct Primary Care (DPC). The name refers to the direct financial relationship between the patient and the doctor. By leaving the middle man (the insurance company) out, the distorted financial incentives disappear. This is the only model that I found where the interest of the patient is aligned with the interest of the physician. It allows for significantly longer visits (our new patient visits are scheduled in 90 minute slots), much more personalized care, better access to the doctor (we guarantee same or next day appointments, and my patients have my email and cell phone number in case they need to reach me outside of normal office hours). I could go on and on about the benefits of direct primary care.

How can patients reach you?

The practice is located at 8895 Centre Park Drive, Suite E, Columbia, MD 21045. Our main office number is (443) 864-5503. A lot more information about me and the practice can be found on our website: http://www.drpolgar.com Click Here

 

Gluten Free Watchdog

Many customers ask me how I learn about unsafe gluten free items so I decided to share this incredible site with you.  Gluten Free Watchdog randomly purchases and tests products for the presence of gluten.  Every week I get emails from them with test results of the products they have tested.  They test items based on what their subscribers want them to test and they test items randomly as well.

This is how I found out that GF Cheerios were not really GF. (see 2 previous blog posts)  I had heard this from many customers as well..telling me how sick they got when they tried them.  It all made sense when I read GF Watchdog’s report on them and how they are not using certified GF oats and they are not using solid testing methods to test the product.  I also learned about a Teff Flour today that is testing higher than 50ppm and it is Certified GF!

How does this happen?  How do you find out about it?

It is easy, just sign up on their website.  The cost is $5 per month and you get more than what you pay for from this invaluable service.

Click Here to Learn More

Non Hybridized Wheat and Spelt

Okay, the subject on “non hybridized wheat and spelt” comes up time and time again so I thought I would set the record straight for all of you.  I had a good laugh last week.  At first it was not funny..I was actually concerned. So here is the story and I am going to use this as a learning experience for you all.

A customer came in saying she had to eat gluten-free (GF). She went on to say that she eats healthy GF breads made with Spelt; also known as Farro or Dinkel.  She wanted to make sure my breads contained this “healthy” Spelt in them.  I think she wanted to educated me about healthy GF eating. I explained to her that we are a GF Facility and that Spelt is NOT Gluten-Free and not allowed in my facility!  She  was stunned.  We were very busy and I was going to try to talk with her further but she just walked out. Maybe she was embarrassed because her husband looked stunned when I said Spelt was not GF.

A person with Celiac Disease (CD) or Gluten Sensitivity (GS) or Wheat Allergy cannot eat Spelt and cannot eat Non Hybridized Wheat when they are traveling in Europe!  I hear so much garbage about this from customers and people on the internet.

Spelt/Farro/Dinkel is gluten. Non Hybridized ancient grains are just as toxic to a Celiac as the modern grains! PERIOD.

There are nuns in Europe producing “GF” Communion Wafers with non-hybridized wheat that they are saying is Celiac Safe.  Wrong. It is testing at 80 ppm….it is not safe folks! There is a safe GF Host out there gang. If your church won’t get it, you can choose to abstain! (I have done several posts on this)

No, I don’t take communion at church and I think GOD is okay with that decision. I could take communion and be sick for ten days and not be able to supply safe meals to those with CD and Food Allergies.  OR    I can skip communion and continue helping others suffering from CD and FA)  Mmmmm, this decision is “no brainer” for me and I don’t think there is a GOD who would hold this against me.

Eating Ancient Grains in Europe: I have heard gluten sensitive people say they went to Europe and ate “ancient non-hybridized wheat” and drank beer and they were fine. Really?  A Celiac would not do this.  So, to the GS folks who do this; maybe you just felt great because the food is so much fresher and not filled with junk and preservatives like it is here so it can sit on a shelf or a sidewalk and remain unchanged for a year!

food-festivals

Modern Wheat Breeding Does Not Contribute to Gluten Toxicity! (ie, the breeding of modern wheat is not what is causing CD or GS or allergies)

-Stay safe and don’t believe everything you read on the internet.

-Don’t believe that GF Cheerios are really GF.

-If you have CD, GS, Wheat, Rye or Barley Allergies, you should not eat Spelt,  Ancient Grains, or “GF Cheerios”. Period! (lots of posts about Cheerios on my blog)

http://naturalsciencenews.com/2016/12/13/modern-wheat-breeding-practices-do-not-contribute-to-gluten-toxicity/

Food Allergy Dad Raises Funds for Childrens National Medical Center

 

I’m so excited to support Food Allergy Dad, Mike Monroe, in his 3k Burpee Challenge. Mike always does amazing athletic challenges to raise funds for food allergies.  On Jan 25th, he will complete 3000 “Burpees” in 12 hours or less to raise funds for food allergy research at Children’s National Medical Center (CNMC)! His goal is to raise $50K.  

-Why I support CNMC: We all know the feeling of being in the hospital and there is nothing safe to eat for a person with celiac or food allergies. Well, CNMC actually feeds you safely in-patient and in the cafeteria with our meals! They truly “walk the walk and talk the talk” and they showed it via the action they took 6 years ago when they put One Dish Cuisine’s food in place to meet the needs of the Celiac & Food Allergy Community! I am all about people and organizations who take action…and don’t just give lip service. Words without action are just words and don’t change anything. Actions bring change.

What is a “burpee”? If you are not a fitness enthusiast; you might be wondering.  We have provided a link below so you can see them performed by Mike.  Doing 3,000 of them is quite a challenge!  I always say, stop complaining and do something positive to fight your food allergy, celiac disease or autism.  Mike is a shining example of that.  If you don’t have the time to do actually go out and do something yourself, please consider supporting someone who is able to make the time and effort and raise funds for an important cause.

The link below is a video of Mike talking about this fundraiser and showing you what a burpee is.  click here

He has raised $21k so far! I hope you will consider a donation; click here.

To follow on Mike’s Facebook Page; click here

Visit CNMC’s Donor Drive today!

 

 

Father of 3 Food Allergy Kids Created App to Find Allergy Friendly Restaurants

AllergyEats is the leading web based guide to finding allergy-friendly restaurants nationwide. I had the pleasure of interviewing Paul Antico. He shares why he founded the site and how he handles dining out with three children with multiple different food allergies and how he feels mainstream restaurants respond to food allergic diners.

What inspired you to found the AllergyEats Website?

About 10 years ago, my wife and daughter were out of town, leaving me and my 2 food-allergic boys to enjoy a “guy’s weekend.”  I wasn’t as well-practiced in managing my kids’ food allergies as I am now, though I knew how to protect them (and, of course, how to use an epinephrine auto-injector).  On Saturday night, I took the boys out to eat around 7PM (first mistake – prime time).  We went to one of our “go-to” restaurants, but the wait was 75 minutes, so we moved on.  At our second “go-to,” the wait was about an hour.  Same as our third.  We didn’t want to wait that long anywhere.  Unfortunately, I had run out of “go-to” restaurants and realized that I wasn’t terribly comfortable determining on-the-fly if a restaurant could accommodate our boys or not.  We ended up driving for about 2 hours – the boys crying in the back of the car – until we ended up at a “greasy pizza joint” that had egg-free pasta and could serve both my kids.  But as I was driving, and reflecting on the many times my family has gone an hour or two trying to find a restaurant we’d be comfortable at – be it in a big city like New York or a smaller town like Lack Placid – I kept saying to myself “I wish there was a guide! I wish there was a guide!”  Being in the business world for 15 years, at that point, I realized there was an unmet need and a market of food-allergic diners and their families that really needed such a guide.  So 2 years later, when I left my job in the financial markets, I decided it was time to start AllergyEats and fill that void.

What allergies do your children have? 

I now have 5 children, 3 of whom have food allergies.  My 19-yo son has had a tree nut allergy his whole life, experiencing 2 anaphylactic events (not including the few we didn’t understand before he was diagnosed – we got lucky!).  My 16-yo daughter has no food allergies.  My 14-yo son currently has allergies to tree nuts and sesame.  He has outgrown eggs entirely – baked and raw – and even outgrew peanuts.  He also has EoE (eosinophilic esophagitis) that reacts to dairy.  My 9-yo son has no food allergies.  And my 7-yo daughter has had an egg allergy her whole life, with – so far – no sign of outgrowing it.

What is the main goal of the AllergyEats website and app?

There are two primary goals of AllergyEats.  The most important, of course, is to provide a valuable tool to the food allergy community that hopefully makes the dining out process easier and more comfortable by providing them with crowd-sourced information showing which restaurants have been better choices than others for food-allergic diners.  The secondary goal is to reward those restaurants that make the effort to properly accommodate our community and thus incent other restaurants to take the appropriate steps themselves.

What is the biggest challenge that you see facing people with food allergies who want to dine out?

The biggest problem is accepting that there is ALWAYS risk – no restaurant is perfect (though One Dish Cuisine may cause me to re-think that) – and making the decision about whether you can accept that or not.  It’s not easy – anaphylaxis can be terrifying, even when you know you have your epinephrine with you.  Of course, you want to minimize your risk by choosing an appropriate allergy-friendly restaurant, which is where the AllergyEats app and website come in.  And, most importantly, YOU have to do your part by: a) never dining out without epinephrine, b) ALWAYS disclosing all your allergies to your server (and possibly the manager or chef), and c) visually inspecting your food as best as possible before eating it.  I’ve found that the “bad events” that happen at restaurants usually involve a breakdown of responsibility by BOTH the restaurant and the diner.  We need to take care of our end of the bargain, so those 3 points above are critical.

Are mainstream restaurants taking food allergies more seriously than they have in the past?

Absolutely.  It’s becoming harder and harder to ignore with so many restaurant diners disclosing food allergies, and even the stingiest of restaurants/chains will eventually understand the spending power of the food allergy community and those they dine with.  I find that smaller, nimble chains seem to be on the front-end of the wave.  Many independents are there too.  The laggards tend to be larger chains, though that is by no means universal.  AllergyEats publishes a list of the Top 10 Allergy-Friendly Restaurants in America each year (coming at the end of February this year), and you can see that there are large chains that do “get it”, though the average score – from AllergyEats users themselves – is generally much higher for the smaller chains.

What are the biggest obstacles a restaurant has to overcome if they want to provide allergen safe meals?

The biggest obstacle is also the simplest – commitment.  It truly is that easy.  Whether the owner of an independent restaurant or the CEO of a chain, that individual’s attitude toward accommodating food-allergic diners will set the tone for all employees.  The training is easy.  The financial burden is minimal.  The disruption to operations in making appropriate changes is almost nil.  So it all comes down to commitment.  Find me an owner who cares about food allergies and I’ll show you an allergy-friendly restaurant.  The reverse is also true.  Find me a CEO who pooh-poohs food allergies and I’ll show you a chain that isn’t safe for our community.

Is there a way for mainstream restaurants to be trained in handling food allergies?

Absolutely.  There are very basic programs online that, while they won’t make a restaurant very allergy-friendly, they will incrementally increase the knowledge of a restaurant’s staff.  But there are also bigger, all-encompassing programs as well for those restaurants that are ready to make the all-in commitment.  The one that is making the most headway is AllerTrain.  AllerTrain does on-site training and well as train-the-trainer programs for larger chains.  They are training restaurants, colleges, entertainment venues, and more.  They do have online modules as well, but the most comprehensive training is provided face-to-face, generally onsite.  Outside of AllerTrain, there are independent trainers as well.  And many restaurants develop their own programs from the knowledge or experience of key employees.

How many times a week do you dine out with your allergic children?

We don’t shy away from dining out.  When we’re home, we usually go out about once every two weeks, though about once each week in the summer.  However, we travel a lot.  We have family in 4 different cities, we like to vacation, and our kids – like so many others – are involved in a ton of activities, some of which have us doing overnight travel.  We also now have to visit our oldest son in college!  When we travel, we eat out most nights.  So I guess my best estimation is that we eat at restaurants probably 50 times a year.  We probably order in another once per week.  And while we certainly have our “go-to” restaurants at home and in some of our destinations, we do like to explore and gain some variety where possible.  So, using AllergyEats of course, we find new favorites as we go.

How do you handle vacations with three of your five children having food allergies?

We’re old pros at this!  After 19 years, we’ve developed a routine.  Really, though, we generally do not have problems dining out.  Using AllergyEats, we do our homework in advance.  Sometimes we have to take a flyer on a restaurant that’s not yet rated on AllergyEats.  Either way, we periodically come across a restaurant that we just don’t feel comfortable can keep our kids safe and we politely leave before ordering.  But that’s rare and we no longer have to search for an hour or two to find a restaurant like we used to.  We find most restaurants want to accommodate our food-allergic kids, so we just have to work with them regarding what they have, what is safe, and how to prepare it safely in the kitchen.  I’m happy to say that in all our years of travel and dining out, “the system” (the dual responsibility of the restaurant and ourselves) has only broken down once, exposing my middle son to dairy.  And the mistake was 100% on our end.  Certainly, other restaurants have made mistakes, but not without either us or them catching the errors in time.  So think about it – our family has had hundreds of meals from restaurants without a single mistake on their part that hasn’t been caught!  Of course, our epinephrine auto-injectors are with us wherever we go and we usually have some basic food like soy nut butter and crackers in our room for a quick, safe snack.

How do you educate schools to keep your children safe?

Fortunately, I haven’t had to be a pro at this.  The primary/middle school my kids have attended from age 3 through 8th grade, Inly School in Scituate, MA, is extremely allergy-friendly.  They won an award from FAAN (Food Allergy and Anaphylaxis Network), one of the precursors to FARE (Food Allergy Research and Education), in 2011 for food allergy excellence.  All staff members are diligently trained and the processes and procedures in place are great.  The school has become known for this and actually brings in some students BECAUSE they are so allergy-friendly.  As the kids have moved onto High School and now College, we’ve found that these schools generally have a program and set of rules in place.  They aren’t as safe as Inly School, by any means, so our kids have to be smart about keeping their epinephrine with them, asking the right questions, taking proper precautions – basically, they have to do what they’ve learned and seen my wife and I do for all these years.  And so far, so good.

How do you handle it if there is an accident and one of your children needs to use their Epi-Pen?

Fortunately, in all these years, we have only had 2 incidents that needed an epinephrine injection.  The first was a tricky delayed onset reaction.  I say tricky because our kids react to many of their allergies without anaphylaxis, needing only Benadryl to ultimately feel better.  In this case, my oldest (with a tree nut allergy only) ate a chocolate ball at a nut-free event.  His throat started to itch, as it does when he has non-dangerous oral allergy syndrome from exposure to some fruits, but this one was a little worse.  Regardless, with us thinking the food was nut-free and the signs pointing to OAS, we went with Benadryl.  Unfortunately, the symptoms weren’t improving.  One could definitely say we should’ve used the auto-injector then (if not earlier), but we actually tried another dose of Benadryl.  Same result.  I prepared my son until he eventually made the decision for us.  “Hit me.”  Boom.  Immediately, he felt better.  (Turns out he had a biphasic reaction – a second anaphylactic event in the hospital – so we were very lucky we finally took the appropriate action.)  We believe, by the way, that the chocolate ball was cross-contamination with tree nuts.  A year later, while teaching at a farm camp, this same son thought he might have accidentally ingested something with tree nut residue in it.  He wasn’t sure, but was feeling symptoms.  Realizing how easily and quickly the epinephrine auto-injector worked the last time, he didn’t hesitate to use it himself.  In hindsight, and while we can’t be sure, I don’t think he was having an allergic reaction – I think anxiety symptoms made it hard to tell.  Yet, either way, he did the right thing.  When in doubt, use the epinephrine.  It is generally considered a very benign treatment that can rarely do any harm to you.  And do not wait as long as we did in that first event.  Anaphylaxis can spiral out of control quickly, even if delayed, and getting epinephrine in the body early is critical.

Do you blame yourself when an accident happens? What emotions do you go through?

Of course I do.  Isn’t that true when anything goes wrong with one’s kids?  In fact, forgetting food allergies for a second, I’m constantly wondering how ALL my past and current actions are affecting the lives of my kids.  (I hope that just makes me a good father and not a lunatic!)  However, I understand that I’m human and mistakes happen, so while I feel terrible and guilty, I apologize to my son or daughter and move on.  They understand that these things happen too.  It stinks, but it’s life – and we all need to accept it.

What would be the ideal dining out situation for you and your family and do you ever think you will feel totally comfortable dining anywhere.

Fortunately, we’ve had many, many very comfortable restaurant meals, but that is also a product of our long experience.  We’ve been doing this long enough to know the best questions to ask and to “read” the staff’s responses well (verbal and physical).  In the optimal case, we would find a restaurant known for their ability to accommodate food-allergic diners (yes, you know where we find them), have a conversation with the staff that shows a real proactive zeal for wanting to satisfy us, and have them proactively reaffirm all the steps they took when the bring the meal (separately or clearly marked) to our table.  That all said, we do still have some “on edge” experiences where we believe the restaurant can accommodate us, but we’re not entirely secure with their food allergy knowledge.  In those cases, we usually have to walk through their menu and their process in the kitchen step by step to ensure that – even if they don’t have broad food allergy knowledge – they will be able to make safe meals for our kids.  Our epinephrine is always with us!

Do you think the general public will ever have a thorough understanding and respect for the serious nature of food allergies?

I hope they never have to – because that would mean a cure is found before broad public acceptance has a chance to take place!  But realistically – because unfortunately we have to accept the fact that a cure is nowhere in sight – yes, I do think the general public will eventually have a healthy respect for the seriousness of food allergies, if not a broad understanding.  Let’s face it, most people in their 40’s and younger today probably know someone with food allergies.  And for the younger cohort in particular, once they actually get to know someone with food allergies, they tend to be compassionate and accept the seriousness of food allergies.  Further, recognize the surge in food allergies that has taken place in our kids over the past 20 years.  Logic would suggest that almost all people 20 years old or younger have grown up with or gotten to know friends with food allergies.  Our kids are more accepting than our older generations; thus, I think the trend is our friend and broader acceptance is taking place every day.

What do you see as the biggest obstacle to widespread respect and understanding of food allergies?

Time.  The younger generation gets it, and each day they become a larger part of the population.  The older generations are also coming into contact with food-allergic individuals more and more each day, with many of them accepting it as well.  I’ve seen the acceptance improve dramatically over my family’s 19 year journey.  It will continue.

What advice can you give to parents of a child with newly diagnosed food allergies?

Do your best not to panic by recognizing that millions and millions of parents have been in your shoes.  Yes, this can be terrifying – we all love our kids more than ourselves – and it can feel overwhelming, but as you start this journey you’ll soon learn that it’s manageable, even if not always (or ever!) comfortable.  Each step has it’s challenges – shopping for safe food, eating food made by a family member or friend, dining out, starting your child in school, going on vacation, having your kids eat out with friends, eventually going to college, etc. – but you take each of these steps one at a time.  Support groups like Kids With Food Allergies Foundation (www.kidswithfoodallergies.org) can be a big help in the beginning, as can local support groups, and online forums.  Of course, finding friends and acquaintances who have been down this path can be extremely helpful as well.  Realize too that, as you proceed down this path, you need to teach your kids all along the way, preparing them for their ultimate independence.  Of course, rule #1?  Never find yourself without epinephrine nearby.

What do you see in the future for AllergyEats?

For now, our focus continues to be on attracting new visitors to our app and website, and building our database of ratings.  A lot of people in this world aren’t online raters in general (I’m one of them), but we have to impress upon these individuals that our food allergy community is all in this together and that each new rating someone adds on AllergyEats makes the app and website even more valuable for future food-allergic diners.  (And yes, I AM a rater on AllergyEats, of course.)  Like many other small businesses in the food allergy space, we’re also trying to execute a business model that can generate a profit (or at least breakeven) since we’re not a non-profit and can’t attract grants and funds in the same way.  If we’re successful in doing so, the opportunity for AllergyEats to expand both vertically and horizontally is awesome.  Our platform lends itself to many, many other options.

I am so grateful that Paul has developed this site to help us find allergy friendly dining spots. Please check out the site!  Click Here for AllergyEats website

paul-antico

Galactosemia

This condition is considered very rare, but we have seen several customers with this over the years; so I thought I would share some information with you about it. Galactosemia is a rare genetic metabolic disorder that affects a person’s ability to metabolize the sugar galactose properly.  Basically it means the person lacks an enzyme (lactase) needed to break down galactose.

Lactose is primarily found in dairy products and is broken down by lactase into glucose and galactose.  In this case the person lacks the enzymes to further break down or metabolize galactose because they are missing the enzyme or it is severely hampered.  This causes toxic levels of Galactose 1-phosphate in tissues. This can cause:

enlarged liver. cirrhosis, renal failure, cataracts, vomiting, seizure, hypoglycemia, lethargy, brain damage, ovarian failure, speech deficits, ataxia, diminished bone density

Without diagnosis and treatment infant mortality rate is 75%. Infants are routinely screened for this in the US.  Testing is done via a blood test from the heel or urine tests. The only treatment is completely eliminating Galactose and Lactose from the diet.

Click Here for more Info

My Favorite Charity; Giving Tuesday

As many of you know, my favorite charities have to do with Celiac Disease, Autism and Food Allergies.  Each year, many of us choose to give to a charity and it is great that we do. I have to make a decision each year about where to put my donation.  This decision is easy to make when I look at where the donation will go and who it will help.

The criteria I use is simple. Where is the strongest need and will it help people locally in the Celiac, Autism and Food Allergy communities?  I choose SAFE Food Pantry because they are local and their mission is to bring safe gluten free/allergen friendly food to those in need. That is precisely what SAFE means: Supplying Allergy Friendly Emergency Food to those in need!

Well meaning family, friends and neighbors usually cannot safely feed those with Celiac Disease or food allergies when their is financial hardship.  The knowledge needed to safely prepare food is not mainstream and this leaves a big hole in the well meaning efforts to feed a family in need. The need is often left unfilled due to the lack of knowledge needed to prepare safe food.

I know first hand the hardship faced when there is an illness of a parent, a death of a parent, a loss of a job and the family is faced with trying to purchase safe food that costs 242% more than regular food. Over the years, I have tried to meet the needs of so many on my own. Unfortunately, One Dish Cuisine cannot financially support every family in need of safe food.  Our customer, Tiffany, saw this need as well and that is precisely why SAFE Food Pantry was started. To avoid any conflict of interest,  I am happy to say that I am on their advisory board only.  This incredible group of volunteers have been working hard on this for several year and are also One Dish Cuisine customers. I am so proud of their hard work.

SAFE Food Pantry is a 501 (c) (3) non profit and is local, here in Howard County, MD. You can donate safe shelf stable food or you can donate money to help them with the expenses incurred in running this food bank.  They are working with the Howard County Food Bank and hope to have them stocked soon!  When you are thinking of giving, please think of giving local, the need is so great!

Those with Celiac, Food Allergies or on a Gluten Free Diet for Autism are often left out in good times and they should not be forgotten in hard times. Thank you for your consideration. You can drop off a non-perishable donation anytime at One Dish Cuisine Cafe Deli and Bakery.

Click here to donate or learn more

food-pantry-kids